Beatification Mortician

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    • #55078
      stephgw64
      Participant

      My name is Teresa. My friends and family always told me that I couldn’t be a Beatification Mortician. That basically means that I couldn’t beautify people who passed away in an open casket scenario so eventually, I gave up on a wonderful, well paid career. None of these pictures nor videos bother me and it doesn’t mean that I am warped minded. It takes a strong person to appreciate life to realize that it does end and I am not afraid of death. Somebody somewhere makes an effort to be caring enough to gently, with care have the respect for the dead. I could have done this for them and for the families.

    • #55124
      xizang
      Participant

      One thing about dead bodies: There’s a difference between the person – the soul – and the body. Once separated from the soul, the body is really a bunch of skin, meat and bone. It’s fascinating to me because we each consider ourselves so unique and different, yet surgeons know exactly where to find every nerve, vein and artery, tendon, gland and duct. Why do we get so uptight when our naked bodies are seen by others? We’re nothing special. We’re all so much alike that we could be printed out of the printing press along with billions of others just like us.

      • #55126
        stephgw64
        Participant

        Agreed @Xizang. I see that as well. I think we (or others) get uptight about seeing each other naked because we are raised to be private.

        • #55166
          xizang
          Participant

          Exactly. My mother was especially a prude. Odd, as her parents were pretty open – her mother (my grandmother) was a nurse and was pretty matter-of-fact about bodies and nature. I rebelled as I grew up – finally going so far as to get into nude modeling at art schools and for photographers. THAT really broke the spell!

          You know, it’s never too late to change careers. I have a friend who’s an attorney. After going to school and becoming an electronics engineer, he worked for the famous Bell Labs inventing communications electronics. One day, he decided he would rather be a patent attorney – so back to school he went.

          Another guy I knew was a real estate investor-developer. But first, he was a medical doctor, specializing in pediatrics. He said that one day, he suddenly had it with screaming kids and bitching mothers, and shit-canned his medical practice and jumped over to just doing real estate.

          Do what your heart tells you. It’s too late only when they start shoveling dirt in on you.

    • #55184
      Pit Viper
      Participant

      I had been thinking about being a mortician a while ago, but things changed, I’m probably just going to go for a vocational job instead. I admire how you think though. There seems to be this astigmatism that looking at gore makes you some sort of Ed Gein clone. It’s refreshing to have another point of view.

      • #55236
        stephgw64
        Participant

        HA! I’m no body snatcher and I don’t plan on making a lamp shade any time soon.

        • #55261
          xizang
          Participant

          Shucks! I was ready to put in my order for a lampshade or two. I can’t decide – brown nipples or pink. Or one of each.

    • #55185
      GoreGirlGoneWild
      Participant

      I am actually in school for my degree in Funeral Services Technology. I also have experience working in a funeral home. Down here, you have to get licensed in order to work with the bodies, and sometimes they call in a hairdresser, but mostly we did all the makeup as well as embalming, dressing and casketing. You could still become a mortician, but check with your local funeral homes and colleges to see what the requirements are for the specific job you want to do. Some funeral homes hire outside beauticians, but rarely. The less overhead, the better, ya know? Why pay an outsider when you can have your embalmer do it? It varies state to state (i’m in the South) so you should look into it. I love my job, and I can’t see myself doing anything else. You ought to go for it, you’d be very happy.

      • #55235
        stephgw64
        Participant

        Thank you @GoreGirlGoneWild But I think I’ll stay with my current job. I can’t afford to lose the benefits.

    • #55286
      sunshine
      Participant

      that’s a awesome career, it’s not too late, go for it!

      • #55295
        stephgw64
        Participant

        Ty @sunshine I’ve had so mush encouragement here, that I think I just might go to my local funeral home and enquire about the qualifications for a licence.

    • #55097
      stephgw64
      Participant

      Maybe not however that was a long time ago… I never had the encouragement when I knew I could do what I wanted, to make the loved ones pleased. They always told me I was morbid. It does take someone, maybe a certain type of person to fill this profession. I am one of those people, the ones who are always there. So why not me? Somebody must be prepared to fulfill this necessary position. I could have been a first responder. I don’t get sick to my stomach at the sign of death no matter how gory it is. I’m just one of those type of people.

    • #55123
      xizang
      Participant

      I’m a lot like you. I can handle dead bodies very well. The only thing that bothers me is people who are suffering pain and fear while dying. The moaning and groaning you hear at accident scenes bothers me. I think it’s the innocent victims suffering. If it was muslim terrorists, I would have fun torturing them to death myself.

      A couple of lessons from your story: 1. Never let others tell you that you can’t do something that you know you really want. 2. Be sure to encourage others who really want to strive for a goal.

    • #55125
      stephgw64
      Participant

      @Xizang Thank you very much. I am 49 years old and at the time I wanted to pursue this career, I was still in high school. Even my guidance counsellor dissuaded me when I was asked what I wanted my career to be. I was exposed to a suicide jumper off a 20 story building when I was only 7 years old. It was on Kingston Rd in Scarborough Ontario. I survived a nasty car accident in 1982 when I was 25 with only myself and one other. I was stuck in the van for what seemed to be hours before I was extracted with 3 obviously dead close friends with me. Of course I cried and it wasn’t the pain however, it didn’t stop me from seeing my friends torn up. I still seen them as normal as the day before. I could have been very good at that job. Thank you once again.

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