The Horrific Reality of Advanced Breast Cancer

The Horrific Reality of Advanced Breast Cancermastectomy, but hopefully they will live, and without fear of remission. But unchecked, it can wreak horrible mutilation before killing it’s victim.

The agony of these women must have been great. I do not know if any are still alive, but given this extreme advanced state…it’s unlikely. Please, get regular checks.

Some things you may want to know:

*One in eight women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in their lifetime.

*Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death among women (lung cancer comes up as number one apparently).

*Only 5% to 10% of breast cancers occur in women with a clearly defined genetic predisposition for the disease. The majority of breast cancer cases are “sporadic,” meaning there is no direct family history
of the disease.

*A history of breast cancer in one breast increases the risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast or in another part of the same breast by 3 to 4 times.(That would explain why doctors would urge you to undergo a full mastectomy).

*Male breast cancer is rare and accounts for only about 1% of all breast cancers.

If you are interested in seeing where your country stands in terms of breast cancer mortality, you can check this link.

Also, as is customary, I invite any female members to share their personal stories involving this disease. Either your own experience, or that of a loved one, I want to hear about it.

Mad props to bungle1 for the images and link.

105 thoughts on “The Horrific Reality of Advanced Breast Cancer”

    1. Both had mastectomies done, my grandmother had no sign of cancer after her breast was removed so she didn’t have to do chemo or radiation. Her sister was not so lucky, after her double masectomy, she had to have a few rounds of radiation but is doing fine now. She survived thyroid cancer about 10 years ago too.

      1. My fianc? and I learned that we were gonna have a baby. 4 mo’s later she was diagnosed with breast cancer. Double mastectomy (both radical), subsequent treatments (radiation/chemo) weren’t enough. Our little boy is 3 now and healthy but I’m raising him alone.
        This disease takes away people that we love and need.

          1. @Dan a conda:

            On boxing day ( do you have boxing day overseas too??) so the day after Christmas day, my 27yo cousin was diagnosed with metastatic bowel cancer. The cancer has spread to her liver and lungs. Like your wife, she has just given birth ( in Nov)to her first baby. The baby is now 6mths old and my cousin is busy every day making scrap books and writing letters to her etc. She won’t live to see her baby start preschool.

    2. Breed, breast feed your children until they are completely weaned (like most mammals are supposed to), and you will avoid such a dreadful future. Ignoring this advise is tantamount to a chain smoker praying his/her future never crosses paths with lung cancer as they light up one for the night.

  1. Cancer runs in my family.
    Mother – died of ovarian cancer
    Uncle – died of brain cancer
    Grandfather – died of lung cancer
    Grandmother – died of breast cancer
    Aunt – died of pancreatic cancer

    Whew! That is enough!

  2. This disease is an insidious monster…someone very close passed away two years ago…doctors caught it very early, but not early enough and as you informed, even one cell will spread to lymphoma, lungs etc…

  3. I diagnose this shit every day although with breast cancer, by the time I see it, it’s already metastasized to other parts of the body. Such a terrible disease. I think these women are really brave for sharing their pictures with the world.

    Cancer runs in my family as well. My grandpa died of melanoma, my grandma had lung cancer, small cell which is the most aggressive kind, but luckily for her they found it by accident and caught it so early that she was cancer free for 7 years until the day she died of other causes. Both of these grandparents also had colon cancer which means I have to get a colonoscopy before I turn 30. Not looking forward to that.

    1. Hmm, i tought melanoma wasnt deadly… and colonscopy was just a thing that only guys needed to worry about. My grandmother died with marrow bone cancer wich evolved to leukemia (or from leukemia, i dont remember, since my grandmother had leukemia for years before marrow bone cancer), she had only 2 weeks to live after it was diagnosed. And i understand that colonoscopy unconfortability… at least now instead of using the finger they can now use a smaller probe for that. Luckly, if i ever reach 40, they dont need to stick anything up my ass for it… 😆

      1. If melanoma is caught early it’s usually easily treated and cured but in my grandpa’s case, it started on his ear and by the time it was diagnosed it had metastasized to other parts of his body. He died about 2 months after he was diagnosed.

        Haha no it’s for women too but usually when they’re older as a standard check up. Unfortunately, if there is a history of colon cancer then you don’t get to wait. My doctor would like me to get one in the next 5 years 🙁

        1. I once had a teacher that had that in her eyelid. She had to go to regular sessions to “remove” it because it kept reapearing… dunno whats up with that… 😐

          Ohh dont worry, you have 5 years to prepare yourself. I’ve wondered that probably all that drama about colonscopy is all an overreaction from the masses and in reality it wont be that bad like they say. (And yeah, i also realise how wierd that sounds coming from a guy… 😆 ) But ive heard from people that did it, and according to them its just the unspecified “fear” that keeps people from doing it. Hell, at least i know i shit things bigger than the radius of a finger or a probe… 😆

          1. I often see melanomas in the eye. Such a strange place and I hate watching them stick the eye with the needle.

            Lol that’s true it’s definitely the anticipation. I’m also not looking forward to the drink you have to consume before the procedure. I hear it tastes awful and obviously you’re stuck on a toilet all damn day. They can poke around back there all they want while I’m knocked out but I don’t want to drink that nasty fluid. But like you said 5 years to prepare myself and I guarantee I’ll be putting it off until the last minute haha!

          2. Maybe in 5 years they will have that cocktail replaced by a pill or something. 😆

            Or you can try my secret “intestinal cleaning” recipe – Drink coffee and eat a bowl of cherries, and in less than 2 hours you’ll have your insides begging to stop… 😆

          3. Hey @Little Foot, sorry to hear about your grandparents. Maybe your grandparents and my grandparents are exchanging ‘cancer’ stories in Heaven?

          4. Thanks @gunkgirl! If you’re grandparents are anything like mine then they’re all up there playing cards, drinking beers and having a few good laughs 😀

          5. @LF I’ve heard from some of my older coworkers who have done it that the prep is way worse than the actual procedure. They’ve all said the cleansing drink tastes like salty Gatorade then you spend a LOT of time in the bathroom! Ironically, that stuff you’ll have to drink is known by its brand name “Go-Lytely”, there’s nothing “lightly” about how you “go” though lmfao! 😀

          6. @der
            A pill would be awesome! I can work with that. I’ll take your word for it that your ‘recipe’ works lol!

            @gunkgirl
            How could I forget bingo my grandma loved playing haha.

            @IGI
            That’s what I’ve heard too. I’m such a picky eater that I’m worried I won’t even be able to get it all down. And I didn’t know that was the name of it lmao!

        2. I had a colonoscopy done when I was 30..maybe younger. It’s not that bad. The worst part is the stuff you have to drink the night before to clear your system out, absolutely disgusting. But, the colonoscopy part, they give you something so you don’t even remember it happening.

          1. @Little Foot. Colonoscopy is not a big deal at all.The prep work leading up to it is a bit of a inconvience but the procedure it’s self is no big deal.Go make your appmt. and get it “behind you” (lol, sorry for the pun).Then you’ll have done it and get back to living your life!!!

    2. Both my father and my sister are breast cancer survivors. Both had mastectomies. My Dad went into day surgery to remove a “cyst” in his left breast and left the hospital without it. A year later, my sister informed us of her condition. Shit man, was there something in the water where we lived in Canada? Wow, what a shock that was. Definitely one of the worst periods of my life.
      Does anyone know what causes a cell to go rogue?

    3. What countries are these poor women from ? I read medical records (mammos specifically) daily and have never seen this. Never so advanced. I can only think they didn’t get medical treatment for whatever reason for it to get to this stage. Would like to know more about this. I also wonder about the people that have those terrible genital tumors. How does this become so advanced before seeing a doctor?

  4. If cancer is predictingly the highest world wide death factor in the near future… so will be its treatments. Medical science is evolving everyday, for example, recently we had the sucessful development of the for Hepatitis C cure to being distribuited to patients with an high success rate. 🙂 But even if the cure for breast cancer (or any other cancer) isnt developed by then, 3D printing reconstructing therapy will, so theres allways a chance for women to recover their lost breasts if they are faced with breast amputation.

    1. @DK many women already undergo reconstructive surgery after a masectomy. My grandmother is 76, she chose not to bother with it. Her sister is only 60, she chose the reconstruction. The surgery actually did a tummy tuck on her and turned that tissue into breasts!

        1. What material would the 3-D printer use to replicate a human body part? The technology is really cool. They make cars out of carbon fiber using this technique. Any design, any body style, shape and size you want.
          Maybe a semi-solid plastic/silicone hybrid for a boob?
          I say let the stem cell thing play out first.

        2. @Der Kop, re: Bio-Ink mentioned below. Very cool. That’s the one thing that I would have questioned about the process. What ‘building material’ could be used.
          I’d only ever seen the process used with solid, non-bio material.

      1. No there won’t. It will never happen even if it is possible to do so. The pharmaceutical industry will never allow it. Healthcare is a huge moneymaker, if no one is sick the financial loss would crush the economy. Clearly you don’t understand how powerful of a influence money is, it is more important than life itself. It’s sad but it is the truth.

        1. The cure will never come from the pharmaceutical companies and as much as it pains me to say it, you speak the truth.
          There are many people who would rather choose profits over the lives of human beings. But mere currency will never surpass the importance of life. Its just the society we live in that molds our minds to believe that, its all we’ve ever known for so long a time.
          It always seemed rather odd to me that radiation therapy is used as a part of cancer treatment. But the reason its used is because it kills anything that comes into contact with it, everything except one thing: Nature.
          The Red Forest is a perfect example of this. To this day it is one of the most contaminated areas in the entire world thanks to the Chernobyl incident. And yet not only has nature survived, but flourished in plant and animal life.
          The cure for all lies in nature, it just takes the right conditions and a lot of time for it to work its perfection.

    1. I’d say at least cancer of the nuts and boobs can be hacked off! I watched a friend’s dad die slowly over years from colon cancer, that was awful! No way to cure it, only prolong the inevitable and his suffering. He should’ve offed himself instead of going through all that.

  5. I have the BRCA2 mutation on both sides of my family and lost both grandmothers and my mother to breast cancer (the latter to secondary pancreatic cancer as a result of a breast cancer, which is doubly fucked because secondary pancreatic cancer is incredibly rare). My older sister underwent a preventative bilateral mastectomy last year, and I figure that’s going to be in my future too, along with probably oophorectomy and hysterectomy, in the next 10 years or so – BRCA mutations increase the risk of ovarian and uterine cancers (about 5% already have ovarian cancer when they go in for prophylactic surgery) and I don’t want to take any risks. I’ve mostly come to terms with it. My heart goes out to these poor women, though; you don’t truly understand the horror of these pictures until you’ve seen a loved one go through it.

  6. I have a predisposed risk for Breast Cancer. Two of my Aunts perished after undergoing chemotherapy and total mastectomy. I have a surviving relative who also developed the cancer. Successfully after a double mastectomy and chemotherapy, she recovered. I have been doing self breast exams once a month and I was shocked to find a hard, pea sized lump in my left breast just 3 weeks ago. It was tender and it bothered me to wear a bra with underwire. I put it off for a week as I was frightened and thought it was nothing. I called my Dr. and he seen me within 3 days (normally the wait time for an appointment is up to 2 weeks. An appointment was scheduled for a mammogram and ultrasound just last week the 18th. My diagnosis was fast as I was told that I did indeed have an abnormality and another ultrasound is scheduled in 6 months. I have a Fibroadenoma. This is a benign breast lesion. I was so stupid for even putting my appointment off even for the week that I did. Breast cancer can spread quickly and I encourage every woman reading this that, if you find a lump…. “Don’t put it off” I was lucky but still stupid.

  7. My mother had this, and had a mastectomy, chemo, lost her hair, and survived in remission for another 20 years. She lived to be 80. They caught it in time. I’m glad she got help. It’s not difficult to do. Don’t let yourselves get this bad before seeing a doctor. There is plenty of help out there for you to get through most every type of cancer if it is detected early.

    You are the only you there is. Take care of yourself while you can. Life might not be precious, but it is here and now, for a little while anyway. Thanks Obli! This hit home for me. I’m glad I could share my mother’s experience with all of you. 🙂

  8. I took care of a lady who specifically refused treatment. The tumor grew for about 5 years, and I think she may have had it in her hip joint. There was also an egg-sized lump in her underarm.

    The lady lost her husband, and she was grieving terribly. She literally wanted to die. She said to me “I didn’t think it would take this long.” The breast tumor “wept” daily and caused her red blood cell count to be extremely low. She did this on her own terms, was in manageable, medicated pain most of the time, increased pain and on an oxygen machine at the end.

    It was her choice, and her decision, and she scared somebody else into having breast surgery, because she showed them what the future looked like.

    Seriously, I’d have the surgery. And then get a glorious tattoo.

  9. Very graphic nature of something we only ever see ladies running around with pink ribbons for. The reality is a lot more gruesome and even after viewing these few photos, I realise how nasty breast cancer can get. It’s a terrible thing!! 🙁

  10. Very agonizing. Cancer knows no age or condition either really. Both my aunt and a friend were going through it at the same time. My aunt, age 60, diabetic, a 2 pack a day chain smoker, hepatitis c, and several heart conditions was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer and was told her health and age made the outcome pretty bleak. She had a mastectomy removing one breast and underwent chemotherapy and radiation. She is now 65, cancer free for 3 years now and going strong (still smoking though).

    My friend, age 32, non smoker, fit and healthy was diagnosed just a few short months after my aunt. Coming to me with her aches she thought it was a clogged milk gland since she had just had her son 7 months prior. After convincing her to go get checked out she was told she had only stage 1 and that it was at a good point that she could choose to have a mastectomy but she could save her breast and just have the tumor removed. I convinced her that a mastectomy might be better on the safe side to which she had both removed so she wouldn’t be “lop sided” as she said. Her road was a long one. She had undergone chemo and radiation 2 times while the cancer they said wasnt a big deal progressed and within a year she was in stage 4. Her bone and brain examination last year revealed healthy bones but that because of so much chemo and radiation her brain was really bad and the doctor gave her a month tops. She passed away only two weeks later leaving behind her 10 year old and her 2 year old who didnt have fathers.
    My aunt is so grateful for having a chance to finish her life even though everything about her was against her but when my friend lost the same battle that she was told wouldbt

  11. Very agonizing. Cancer knows no age or condition either really. Both my aunt and a friend were going through it at the same time. My aunt, age 60, diabetic, a 2 pack a day chain smoker, hepatitis c, and several heart conditions was diagnosed with stage 4 breast cancer and was told her health and age made the outcome pretty bleak. She had a mastectomy removing one breast and underwent chemotherapy and radiation. She is now 65, cancer free for 3 years now and going strong (still smoking though).

    My friend, age 32, non smoker, fit and healthy was diagnosed just a few short months after my aunt. Coming to me with her aches she thought it was a clogged milk gland since she had just had her son 7 months prior. After convincing her to go get checked out she was told she had only stage 1 and that it was at a good point that she could choose to have a mastectomy but she could save her breast and just have the tumor removed. I convinced her that a mastectomy might be better on the safe side to which she had both removed so she wouldn’t be “lop sided” as she said. Her road was a long one. She had undergone chemo and radiation 2 times while the cancer they said wasnt a big deal progressed and within a year she was in stage 4. Her bone and brain examination last year revealed healthy bones but that because of so much chemo and radiation her brain was really bad and the doctor gave her a month tops. She passed away only two weeks later leaving behind her 10 year old and her 2 year old who didnt have fathers.
    My aunt is so grateful for having a chance to finish her life even though everything about her was against her but when my friend lost the same battle that she was told wouldnt be a fight.

  12. A few years ago my grandma was diagnosed with stage-4 breast cancer. It had spread a bit, and she had chemo and radiation. Diagnosed in April, died in July. The treatments made her sick, they put her on morphine for the pain, which also made her sick. They should have let her go without torturing her first. She was the woman who took care of me and taught me to read and…. say the body parts in spanish. Everything. She got a little mean during the last months. Obviously I miss her terribly and cherish the 18 years of my life we shared.
    When my grandma was diagnosed my mom and her 3 sisters all decided to get checked out. My aunt had breast cancer. She had a mastectomy and treatment and she seems to be doing fine now.
    They found anomalies in my mom’s breasts. Like, things that they expect to become cancer. She has to have a mammogram 1-2 times a year. I don’t know much, I’m not too close to her.
    I expect someday that I’ll have breast cancer. Myself, my mom, and my grandma share a few other medical things genetically.

  13. I have also lost many, family members, and friends, to this devastating disease,,, this SUCKS! Our family is currently dealing with my sister in laws Cancer 🙁 As you stated Btother Obli, her cancer started in both her lungs, then moved up to her brain Quickly, and has now traveled to her Liver, and shoulder area. Poor girl just lost all her hair, and sleeps most of the time. My Brother Denis is devastated, because he had found true love for the first time in his life, and they were living their dream. So a few years ago they purchased a beautiful waterfront property, in the boonies, where they planed to retire, and live a simple, peaceful life, away from all the traffic, and all the inner city crap. With all the advances in the medical field, you would think that cancer would be a thing of the past, by now! ? ! ? 🙁

  14. Interesting that most of these women are of average or greater weight. My understanding of cancer was that in advanced stages (which these obviously are), weight loss is a serious problem.

    This makes sense. Your body is working over time to make these unnecessary cells and keeping them fed.

    @obli.. Sorry to hear of the loss of your Dad… Hell of a thing. My bet is he would be proud of your efforts here.

  15. Cancer is horrific. My father was a lifetime smoker. He was a tough, bar fighting mean ass Irishman. He got cancer in his lung. Treatment didn’t work and it spread all over, including a grapefruit sized tumor in his brain. He went from 200 pounds and muscles, to 80 pounds and skin and bones. Along with my family, I was by his side when he passed. I was holding his hand, telling him it was ok to go, and that we’d take care of Mom when he took his last breath. It was the most painful, tough time of my life.

    1. It was like that with me and my aunt. I watched a brilliant special ed teacher go from 150 pounds to 70 pounds. I refused to leave her alone so she wouldn’t die alone. It wasn’t just for me, it was for the family who couldn’t be there and wanted to be there. I stayed with her until she died. It aged me. I don’t regret a single minute of it, though. I think she was hanging on because she thought she hadn’t done enough for a lot of people. She changed lives in a very positive manner. So it was okay for her to rest. Her daughter was a total cunt about the whole thing, too. It’ll go back on her someday. When she died she looked peaceful, too. 2 days prior to that she was calling to her sister who died over 20 years ago, looking up as some place in the ceiling only she could see.

  16. Mu bf, my mom, and my aunt had it. My aunt died from it. My bf had radiation and is fine now, it was a slow growing cancer fed by estrogen. My mom survived it twice. The first time it was the same as my bf. She had radiation and it left. The second time she had mammary metastatic carcinoma. Because the fucktard doctor didn’t bother to her mammogram until after she felt a lump in the shower. She had to have chemo and radiation because she was in the second level. That bout aged her, and later her teeth had to be extracted. Thankfully her death was where she fell asleep and her heart stopped. It was too tired. So she died the ideal death, take a nap and never wake up.

    As a side note, 3% of breast cancer deaths are men. So pay attention to your guy titties, a lump should be checked immediately. There are also cancer clusters when men served in the military and stayed on a base. Some of those bases are super fund clean up sites. Men need to be as diligent as women. And yes, young women need to check regularly, too.

  17. This really hits home for me. My 69 year old mother recently had a mastectomy due to breast cancer. Plus she has Parkinson’s on top of that. Thankfully she is currently in remission, but to be honest, she could almost fit right in with these pics. Of course it’s not nearly as bad, but she’s mutilated for the rest of her life because of this god awful cancer. I even started a gofundme for her because insurance doesn’t cover the kinds of things she needs at home to provide some comfort and quality of life, but after a couple donations it went dead. Oh well. It is what it is.

    I can’t imagine the trauma these women endure(d). Especially knowing how horrible it is for my mom, and she actually had a surgeon, unlike these women.

    Fuck cancer.

Leave a Reply